Senior care homes, COVID-19: death and working conditions

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NDPP

Family Reeling as Senior Dies of Malnutrition Not COVID-19

https://twitter.com/CBCQueensPark/status/1271130089279885318

"Pietro Bruccoleri died late last month at an embattled Ontario long-term care home where 23 seniors have succumbed to COVID-19, but it wasn't the virus that killed him - it was exhaustion caused by malnutrition. 'We did not expect the neglect,' said his oldest daughter Rina Di Silva, 55..."

Doing a great job Ontario. Just think of all the pension money saved!

NDPP

"Imagine you work at a LTC home as a PSW. You feel sick and are told to 'isolate at home.' You are a single parent/sole earner caring for your parents and kids in one apartment. What will you do? How would you protect your family from COVID? Ontario government needs to invest in support."

https://twitter.com/drwarner/status/1271431141896192001

NDPP

Quebec Coroner's Office Orders Public Inquiry into COVID-19 Deaths in Long-Term Care Homes

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/coroner-public-inquiry-covid-19-...

"Quebec's chief coroner has ordered a wide-ranging public inquiry into deaths that have occurred in the province's long-term care homes, private seniors' residences and other residential institutions for vulnerable people over the first six weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 60% of the province's COVID-19 deaths have occurred in public or private long-term care homes. Quebec's chief coroner Pascale Descary said the investigation will be totally public, from beginning  to end...."

Unlike Ontario.

NDPP

Former Ontario Premier Mike Harris is Raking in Profits from the Long-Term Care Home System He Helped Create

https://t.co/x04vXoQWP1

"...Under the Harris government, the growing corporate business of caring for seniors flourished and corporate players such as Sienna Senior Living, Revera, Extendicare, and Chartwell expanded their reach. Now, in the middle of a global pandemic, the country is witnessing the true vulnerability of seniors in long-term care homes. To date, more than 8,000 people have died from COVID-19 in Canada. More than 6,800 of them - 83 per cent - have died in these homes..."

No wonder Doug Ford wants his own hand-picked inquiry process.

NDPP

LISTEN: "The Ontario government is considering  a move to grant organizations and people immunity from some COVID-19 lawsuits. Families suing long-term care homes fear it could make accountability that much harder to come by."

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-june-22-2020-1.5622150

jerrym

On the CBC National News last night it was noted that Canada is spending one third less than the other developed countries on long term countries. When this fact is combined with the privatization of senior care in much of Canada resulting in the focus being on profits at the expense of spending on care and the related lack of long term care home inspections, it is not surprising that Canada leads the world by a wide margin in having 81% of  all of its Covid-19 deaths ocuring in these homes. The entire system needs funding and de-privatization. 

kropotkin1951

jerrym wrote:

On the CBC National News last night it was noted that Canada is spending one third less than the other developed countries on long term countries. When this fact is combined with the privatization of senior care in much of Canada resulting in the focus being on profits at the expense of spending on care and the related lack of long term care home inspections, it is not surprising that Canada leads the world by a wide margin in having 81% of  all of its Covid-19 deaths ocuring in these homes. The entire system needs funding and de-privatization. 

Defunding is good for all private operators. However I would far prefer to see seniors treated with dignity by giving them the resources to be able to pay for the care that we all know is required. Imagine a world were the OAS is $2000 a month and all seniors could think about coops and other arrangements that are resident controlled and operated.

jerrym

kropotkin1951 wrote:

jerrym wrote:

On the CBC National News last night it was noted that Canada is spending one third less than the other developed countries on long term countries. When this fact is combined with the privatization of senior care in much of Canada resulting in the focus being on profits at the expense of spending on care and the related lack of long term care home inspections, it is not surprising that Canada leads the world by a wide margin in having 81% of  all of its Covid-19 deaths ocuring in these homes. The entire system needs funding and de-privatization. 

Defunding is good for all private operators. However I would far prefer to see seniors treated with dignity by giving them the resources to be able to pay for the care that we all know is required. Imagine a world were the OAS is $2000 a month and all seniors could think about coops and other arrangements that are resident controlled and operated.

I agree although there does come a point in some senior's lifes when they cannot take care of themselves and home care visits are not enough. 

jerrym

double post

NDPP

Canada's COVID-19 Deaths in LTC Double the Average of Other Countries

https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational/status/1276258546670276611

"Long term care residents make up 81 per cent of all reported COVID-19 deaths in Canada compared to an average of 43 per cent among all countries studied."

Unfortunately, there seems relatively little concern by Canadians at this appalling eldercide and lack of care.

NDPP

There's No Quick Post-Pandemic Fix for Canada's Long Term Care Facilities, Say Experts

http://newsletters.cbc.ca/q/17GvfDCEOc0A8cpj1Jnyrh/wv

"The novel coronavirus exploited a weakness in Canadian society - the country's tendency to warehouse its elderly in poorly supervised long-term care homes. The results, say experts, were completely predictable..."

kropotkin1951

jerrym wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

jerrym wrote:

On the CBC National News last night it was noted that Canada is spending one third less than the other developed countries on long term countries. When this fact is combined with the privatization of senior care in much of Canada resulting in the focus being on profits at the expense of spending on care and the related lack of long term care home inspections, it is not surprising that Canada leads the world by a wide margin in having 81% of  all of its Covid-19 deaths ocuring in these homes. The entire system needs funding and de-privatization. 

Defunding is good for all private operators. However I would far prefer to see seniors treated with dignity by giving them the resources to be able to pay for the care that we all know is required. Imagine a world were the OAS is $2000 a month and all seniors could think about coops and other arrangements that are resident controlled and operated.

I agree although there does come a point in some senior's lifes when they cannot take care of themselves and home care visits are not enough. 

Of course some seniors are going to need more care than others at different times in their lives. My Mom was in a Legion facility that had a long term care wing for those that needed that level of care but most of the buildings were one bedroom apartments. When she moved in she made all her own food except on nights she wanted to go down to the caferteria. In her last few months after she turned ninety staff dropped by three or four times a day to check up on her. She never had to move her care level just increased as she aged and her health problems increased. We have the models of care what we don't have is the models to fund them.

I am pretty typical senior and I receive under $1300 a month for CPP and OAS. People who also get the GIS do not have enough financial resources to have any say in the type of housing and care they will receive. So instead of the $613 that OAS currently hands out it should be $2000 and leave the CPP intact.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..the senior's complex i'm in provides an interesting model. it took me almost 3 yrs (waiting list) to get into the place and it has a great reputation. i lucked out!

..there are 3 bldgs. one of them you need to be on a food program. the cost for that program is around $200 a mon for 2 meals a day. cost will be going up later this year. the rents are somewhat reasonable so that helps. the food prep is all in house and the meals are quite good. more subsidies would certainly help as would an increase in pensions.

..those in the 2nd bldg, my bldg, can also be on that food program if they choose. there is a tunnel between the 2 bldgs so you never have to go outside. my neighbour had a stroke a while ago. some of her memory has yet to return, the stove was removed from her place for safety reasons. she gets around ok on her own and uses the food program. 

..i see support staff moving through my bldg all the time. dispensing meds and providing various services to various clients. they travel through both blds and possibly the 3rd one which is a nursing home. so economies of scale apply.    

..i have to say, as a working class stiff, it ain't a bad place to be in when life is winding down. even though i'm still able to live independently the services i see all around me are a huge comfort. 

NDPP

Seniors Who Survived COVID Now At Risk From Lack of Air Conditioning in Long Term Care Homes

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2020/07/08/seniors-who-survived-covi...

"Ontario advocates warning that seniors already preyed upon by COVID-19 will continue dying - not from COVID but from the heat - unless the government mandates air-conditioning in residents' rooms. Extendicare isn't providing even fans for residents..."

Notwithstanding Canadians' obvious and longstanding tolerance of official elder-abuse and death by negligence, all such facilities must come under government control and minimal humane standards. What a shocking and shameful ongoing atrocity.

NDPP

Canada Not Ready For Second Wave of COVID-19, Senate Committee Says

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/canada-not-ready-for-second-wave-of-covi...

"A new report from a committee of senators says the country is ill-prepared to handle a second wave of COVID-19. The Senate's social affairs committee says the federal government needs to pay urgent attention to seniors in long-term care homes where outbreaks and deaths in the pandemic have been concentrated. There are also concerns in the report about the vulnerability of low-income seniors should there be a second wave of the novel coronavirus later this year..."

NDPP

Why is Ontario Still Torturing Residents of Long Term Care Homes? (radio)

https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-39-metro-morning/clip/15786318-lo...

"Long-term care during the pandemic: no air conditioning makes matters worse."

 

Despite empty words from politicians the eldercide continues. Why? Your inaction.

[email protected]

Aristotleded24
NDPP

They did. By all accounts it was well known. Numerous reports on all its frailties. Over and over again. Governments knew but did nothing. I consider it a serious criminal matter.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Alarm bells were raised as far back as the 1980s when I was in school and the issue of how maltreated elders were in these facilities was of serious concern. The concept of north american society warehousing their elders stretches back a long way.

Aristotleded24

As my link shows, it's too bad that there weren't any politicians who tried to raise the alarm and take action on the problem. Oh.

Even more maddening in retrospect that the provincial election focused on faith based schools at the expense of issues facing everyday people, including elder care.

jerrym

The Ontario Registered Nurses Association no longer supports the Ford government’s independent commission into long-term care homes because it will drag out changes that need to occur now, namely increased staffing and PPE. 

The CEO of Ontario’s professional nursing association says she no longer supports the Ford government’s independent commission into long-term care homes, saying it will lead to more political foot-dragging and inaction.

Doris Grinspun, chief executive officer of the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario, said the government should instead focus on increasing staffing and ensuring a six-month supply of personal protective equipment or PPE in homes, as the province prepares for a second wave of the novel coronavirus.

“Everything we need to know about this pandemic, what we did right and what we did wrong, we already know,” Ms. Grinspun, a health policy expert who has held the position since 1996, said in an interview. What we need now is sincere, fast and funded action.”

In addition to hiring more nurses and personal support workers, the RNAO, which represents 44,000 registered nurses, nurse practitioners and students, has for years been calling for each resident to receive four hours a day of personal and nursing care. The organization says each home should have a nurse practitioner per 120 residents, as well as a nurse who specializes in infection control on site. Ms. Grinspun also said families should also be allowed back into homes to care for their loved ones even during outbreaks, which she said will prevent malnutrition, dehydration and loneliness.

“I’m not sure what we are going to discover in the commission. We are going to point fingers. But what seniors and what families need, and quite frankly what homes and staff need, is not pointing fingers. It’s acting on solutions now,” she said.

Premier Doug Ford said Friday that details of the commission, which is supposed to start this month, will be revealed in the next week or so. Some labour leaders and critics, including the NDP, have called for a full-scale public inquiry into the tragedy in nursing homes, where more than 1,800 residents have died.

The Ministry of Long-Term Care is also set to release a report on July 31 about staffing levels, which the government has said will inform a “comprehensive staffing strategy” to be implemented by the end of the year. That staffing study, led by an expert panel, was among the recommendations made by Justice Eileen Gillese in her inquiry into serial killer Elizabeth Wettlaufer, a former nurse who killed eight nursing home patients. That inquiry took two years to complete and a final report was released last July.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-ceo-of-the-registered-nur...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..deaths by facility in canada

Link

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The coronavirus exposes the perils of profit in seniors’ housing

In May 2020, Orchard Villa, a long-term care home in Pickering, Ont., made headlines for a bad COVID-19 outbreak. Just two months into Ontario’s lockdown, 77 patients in the 233-bed home had died.

A report by Canada’s military revealed horrifying conditions, short staffing and neglect. Some family members blamed for-profit ownership, arguing that COVID-19 had simply exposed, in tragic fashion, the impact of prioritizing profits in the operation of seniors housing.

Notably, Orchard Villa had been purchased in 2015 by private equity firm Southbridge Capital, adding it to Canada’s growing stock of “financialized” seniors’ housing — bought by financial firms as an investment product.

This has followed the trend of what’s known as financialization in the global economy, in which finance has come to dominate in the operations of capitalism, prioritizing investor profits over social, environmental and other goals. In seniors’ housing, financialization has arguably intensified the profit-seeking approach of private owners, with harmful outcomes for residents and workers alike.

Grey wave

Seniors’ housing includes both government-subsidized long-term care (LTC) homes (nursing homes), and “private-pay” retirement living. Canada’s population is aging, with a so-called grey wave predicted to require 240,000 new spaces by 2046.

Industry experts call this “a rising tide that can’t be denied.” Investors are rushing to get on board, both with LTCs, where long waiting lists and government funding ensure steady income, and with retirement living — where hospitality services (housekeeping, laundry, meals) and private-pay health-care services can drive rents as high as $7,000 a month.

Financial operators have spent two decades consolidating ownership of Canadian seniors housing. These operators include Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), institutional investors and private equity firms.

In 1997, the first seniors housing REIT launched with 12 homes. What followed was a consolidation frenzy and the rise of financial firms like Chartwell, Sienna, Revera, Extendicare, Amica, Verve and others. By 2020, financial firms controlled about 28 per cent of seniors housing in Canada, including 17 per cent of LTCs and 38 per cent of retirement homes.

American owners

Ownership has also become international. Today, Canada’s biggest owners are the largest health-care REITS in the United States.

Ventas REIT and Welltower REIT entered Canada in 2007 and 2012, and have amassed major interests in 36,792 suites (225 homes). Canada has also seen a surge in U.S.-based private equity ownership by firms that recognize similarities between our private-pay retirement sector and privatized health care south of the border.

They are eager to capitalize on the growing number of seniors on LTC waiting lists who require care and are forced into private-pay retirement living.....

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