Police State

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laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Didn't Winnipeg City Council just renew some kind of high school policing program, Aristotleded? Before hearing it was up for debate, I had no idea the school board had such a program.

Aristotleded24

laine lowe wrote:
Didn't Winnipeg City Council just renew some kind of high school policing program, Aristotleded? Before hearing it was up for debate, I had no idea the school board had such a program.

Sorry laine, I'm just seeing this question right now. I think what you're talking about is the school resource officer program, which has been running for a long time.

Aristotleded24

Here's another incident in Calgary:

Quote:

Staff Sgt. Gordon Macdonald, who was the commanding officer at the APU described Kafi as "flinching back."

Then, in a swift move, Dunn slams the handcuffed woman face-first onto the ground in what Macdonald described as a "judo-style throw."

Kafi's head can be seen bouncing off the concrete floor.

Kafi's mother, who had been sitting quietly in the gallery, watched the video of her daughter's head bouncing off the concrete floor and let out a guttural noise. She quickly left the courtroom. 

Macdonald testified he not only witnessed the incident but also heard the unmistakable sound of Kafi's head hitting the ground.

"There's only one type of sound when somebody's bone hits the floor and that's what I heard," he said from the witness box.

Macdonald testified that he feared the worst for Kafi's condition and called paramedics. 

Dunn backed off. Normally, the arresting officer accompanies an arrestee to the hospital, but Macdonald felt it wasn't appropriate for the constable to continue to be in Kafi's presence.

"I advised him that it was the worst use of force that I had seen," said Macdonald.

Macdonald said that when Kafi arrived, she was complaining about her arrest. He said she was belligerent though not threatening or aggressive.

Pollard asked the 30-year officer if he'd seen Kafi act in a way that would have justified Dunn's reaction.  

"No," said Macdonald.

Thank you Sgt. Macdonald for telling the truth about what you saw on your shift. That is true public service, and is faithful to your duty to stop the bad guys even if those bad guys wear police crests. As Bill Maher said, if good cops hate bad cops so much then they should turn in the bad cops.

Aristotleded24

Another story from Thompson:

Quote:

A First Nations woman was knocked unconscious at an RCMP detachment in Thompson, Man., and despite the act being caught on video, no formal investigation was launched and the woman says she was bullied into withdrawing her complaint against the officers involved.

The video, which CBC News obtained through a court application, has one former police watchdog calling for a full probe, and has prompted a lawsuit alleging she was discriminated against because she is Indigenous. Garson is a member of Tataskweyak Cree Nation.

Genesta Garson was 19 years old when she was picked up by two community safety officers on Jan. 6, 2018 outside of the Northern Inn in Thompson, a city of about 13,000 in northern Manitoba, on the suspicion of being drunk. 

She was supposed to spend the night sleeping it off on a cold cement bed in a holding cell. 

Instead, she left in an ambulance after a safety officer punched her in the chin, knocking her unconscious.

...

After leaving hospital, Garson was charged with assaulting an officer. Gupta took her case pro bono and the charge was later stayed. 

Gupta then helped her file a formal complaint against the RCMP with the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission in November 2018.

The complaint, which was obtained by CBC, says Gupta was to be the RCMP's formal contact throughout the process.

However, that didn't happen.

Instead, Garson and Gupta say several different RCMP officers came to Garson's home in Split Lake, 140 kilometres north of Thompson, asking her to sign a form withdrawing the complaint.

Garson says she felt bullied, pressured and wanted the police to leave her alone, so she signed.

"They kept coming to my house, and to where I worked here in Split Lake until I signed the paper," Garson said. "After that, they left me alone. I do not remember how many times they came to the house, I lost count."

Gupta said he was shocked when he got a letter from RCMP officials saying Garson had withdrawn the complaint. 

"That I find the most appalling out of all of this," Gupta said.

"RCMP are aware that I'm counsel for Ms. Garson and yet try to circumvent that process by speaking to her on their own?"

Question for people who know more about the law than I do. If what the woman says is true and that officers pressured her to withdraw the complaint, could that not be considered a criminal act of intimidation?

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Wow, that definitely sounds like intimidation. Her whole treatment was horrific, racist and mysogiynist. That move to visit her in her home community to convince her to withdraw her complaint is the icing on an ugly sh*t cake.

Aristotleded24

Yet another complaint from within:

Quote:

In her complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, the Iranian-Canadian officer said she was punched by her partner at the time when she tried to step in during the March 2011 arrest. After reporting him, she said, she was passed over for promotions and left vulnerable to prolonged racist and sexist attacks from colleagues who called her a "rat."

CBC is referring to the woman by a pseudonym, "Darya," because she fears more backlash for speaking out.

"If you're not white — it doesn't matter if you're a citizen or you're an employee, you don't have any rights. It's systematic abuse," said the officer, who was hired by the Toronto Police Service (TPS) in 2009. 

In an exclusive interview with the CBC's The Fifth Estate, Darya said she was branded a liar after reporting her fellow officer and subsequently put at risk when other members of the force abandoned her during volatile calls. 

...

In her complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, the Iranian-Canadian officer said she was punched by her partner at the time when she tried to step in during the March 2011 arrest. After reporting him, she said, she was passed over for promotions and left vulnerable to prolonged racist and sexist attacks from colleagues who called her a "rat."

CBC is referring to the woman by a pseudonym, "Darya," because she fears more backlash for speaking out.

"If you're not white — it doesn't matter if you're a citizen or you're an employee, you don't have any rights. It's systematic abuse," said the officer, who was hired by the Toronto Police Service (TPS) in 2009. 

In an exclusive interview with the CBC's The Fifth Estate, Darya said she was branded a liar after reporting her fellow officer and subsequently put at risk when other members of the force abandoned her during volatile calls. 

...

This past July, another sexual harassment case before the tribunal concluded with a ruling in favour of the officer. The tribunal adjudicator found that Toronto police Const. Heather McWilliam, a drug investigator, was subjected to rampant sexual harassment that resulted in a "poisoned work environment." 

At the end of a six-year process, McWilliam was awarded $85,000, and the the Toronto Police Services Board was ordered to develop new human rights policies and training programs. Since then, the TPS board said it's "working diligently" to implement the tribunal's order to provide sexual harassment training to all officers in her division. 

In the three most recent human rights complaints reviewed by CBC, nearly 80 officers from four different divisions are accused of either participating in or turning a blind eye to harassment.

Seven TPS officers are currently suspended with pay, accused of sexual violence against women on the force or members of the public. Two of them have been charged with sexual assault.

But a decade of TPS disciplinary records obtained by CBC suggests that few disciplined officers face consequences.

It's pretty disturbing the allegations that Darya made against her colleagues.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

I've read numerous similar stories, and even heard some in person, from female police officers, and in general any police officer who tries to be honest about the horrendous abuse of power routinely exercised by almost all cops. The police culture is a disgustingly unfair and bigoted one, which is why the police need to be abolished and rebuilt from scratch. Unfortunately, as long as capital is in charge, this will never happen, because the oligarchs need thugs to protect their riches.

Aristotleded24

An update on the case of the Nunavut Mountie caught on video dooring a suspect:

Quote:
An RCMP officer in Nunavut “did not intentionally strike” an Inuk man with his truck’s door over the course of an arrest last June, according to external investigators with the Ottawa Police Service.

...

“The investigation has determined that the RCMP officer driving the vehicle did not intentionally strike the community member with the vehicle door – whereas the vehicle came to a sliding stop on a snow and ice covered track, the driver’s front tire went off the track, the vehicle dipped forward and the opened driver’s door swung forward and struck the community member,” the OPS wrote in a media release on Tuesday.

The Ottawa police concluded the incident “does not meet the threshold of a criminal offence” of assault or assault with a weapon “as the applied force was unintentional.”

But as someone else pointed out:

Quote:

Benson Cowan, head of Nunavut Legal Aid, said the Ottawa police statement gives little information about a much larger story.

“Police occupy a place of public trust and the public has an interest in how they go about their jobs. We're owed an explanation when something happens. What we got was a conclusion. There's no transparency and no accountability,” Cowan said.

“We've all seen that video and we know that the police explanation doesn't explain everything we see in that video.”

Cowan said even if people accept the truck door hitting the man was an accident, it is troubling to say the arrest was lawful.

“On what basis was it justified that five police officers be involved in the takedown of this man?”

Cowan said Ottawa police also don't explain why the RCMP acted so swiftly to arrest a man who was never charged.

“Why on earth, if it was public intoxication, would you drive so close and put someone at risk?”

Aristotleded24

Meet one of Winnipeg's finest:

Quote:
Patrol Sgt. Kevin Smith has faced at least one Law Enforcement Review Agency complaint, and was also involved in a case where a man was awarded $13,500, after he filed a lawsuit saying Smith illegally searched his bag and another officer assaulted him during a traffic stop.

The 2018 soccer game allegation comes from a complaint filed by the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization of Manitoba against Smith, stating that as assistant coach of a girls' soccer team, he used his position as a police officer to threaten IRCOM's coach and players.

The complaint to the Winnipeg Youth Soccer Association alleges Smith yelled, "I am a Winnipeg police officer, you should watch out buddy, you and your girls," to the Ethiopian-born IRCOM coach, after a locker-room disagreement broke out between the two under-18 teams.

...

Alex Reid told CBC News that because of his time as an executive assistant at city hall, he knew enough to complain to LERA when he had confrontation with Smith, following a joke Reid made about Smith's parking job. 

...

Reid said he was held for almost an hour by Smith, who chased him down after he insulted the officer's parking job because his patrol car was blocking the entrance to his home.

Smith was aggressive and ordered him into his home to get his identification, Reid said.

When he used the time to call a lawyer friend and kept him on the line when he walked out, Smith got angry, hung up the cordless phone and said he was going to write up a ticket.

Reid said he was given a "bogus ticket" for failing to signal right when meeting a moving vehicle. He documented the entire incident in a blog that was later deleted, but can still be found through archival searches

"He was acting aggressive and his face was red and I had several times asked him to calm down … because he was constantly escalating, escalating," Reid said. "And I just thought, what's wrong with this guy?"

He said the ticket was thrown out after he fought it in court.

He filed a LERA complaint. Five years later, he called the agency to follow up, and was told it was determined that Smith wasn't guilty of any offence and the case had been closed.

Smith was also named in a 2016 lawsuit involving a Winnipeg man who alleged he was assaulted and his bag was illegally searched during a routine traffic stop.

Rahim Dostmohamed alleged the officers unlawfully searched his bag and slammed his face into the side of his car, causing him to bleed from his nose and mouth for days, when he was pulled from his vehicle in January 2015.

The suit alleged that a different officer assaulted Dostmohamed, while Smith searched his bag without justification, breaching his Charter rights.

You can get to know Sgt. Smith better here and here.

NDPP

Canada's Spy Agency Wants More Power.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/csis-act-vigneault-1.5911065

"...The country's spy chief is intensifying his campaign for new powers and sounding the alarm about the Canadian Security Intelligence Service's ability to keep tabs on hostile foreign states. But civil liberties advocates are urging Parliament to be skeptical..."

This follows similar proto-fascist American national security trends. Better email your MP to say NO loudly and clearly because not only do CSE/CSIS have more than enough powers already, but ultimately it's not China or Russia they wish to target more, it's you...

NDPP

Vancouver police apologize for wrongly handcuffing and detaining retired black judge

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bc-black-judge-arrest-1....

"Selwyn Romilly, 81, was mistaken for an assault suspect estimated to be 40-50 years old."

Close enough?

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