Grave of 215 First Nations children at residential school found in Kamloops BC

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laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Independence movements in places like Zimbabwe didn't prove too successful so perhaps not a model to emulate given that the global north could not abide with land distribution policies etc. The South African experience is not a great one since there was no real significant shift in who owns and controls lands and economic goods - just some adjustments to political power and changes to egregious laws. It's a good question and probably takes some ground breaking thinking as to what would work as just reparations.

Edzell Edzell's picture

laine lowe wrote:
It's a good question and probably takes some ground breaking thinking as to what would work as just reparations.

I agree but don't see much evidence of that hard thinking now or on the horizon. I'm personally quite incapable of coming up with any workable suggestion apart from sincere co-operative negotiation, but the will for that is not evident.

Pondering

You can read the entire paper here:

https://redpaper.yellowheadinstitute.org/

Citizens Plus and the Red Paper

From 1968 to 1969, a Federal Liberal government led by Pierre Trudeau drafted a new Indian policy. As a response to the activism of Indigenous leaders, the document proposed a shift away from oppressive and discriminatory government policies, and rooted in equality, or as Trudeau put it, “a just society.” 

These were revolutionary times for many; some demanded inclusion in a polity that had marginalized so many for so long, while others formed social movements that questioned the legitimacy of capitalism and the state altogether.

But the struggle meant something different for Indigenous people. It was a demand for integrity from Canadians: honouring of treaty rights, restitution, and self-determination.

The White Paper, as the new policy became known, betrayed those demands and prescribed political and legal assimilation into Canadian society. This, of course, was more of the same.

In response, First Nation leaders in Alberta drafted Citizens Plus in 1970 (known as the Red Paper). The Red Paper was a constructive alternative to Canada’s vision. While this history is well-known, including the policy debate that has followed the White and Red Papers into the present, Yellowhead Institute is inspired by the notion of the Red Paper as a productive vision of Indigenous futures that critically engages with Canadian frameworks.

Land Back: A Yellowhead Institute Red Paper

In the case of our Red Paper, we aim to link Canadian policy prescriptions more closely to land and resource management, and to outline the corresponding Indigenous alternatives. Like the 1970 original, we aim to support communities with additional information, ideas, and tools to respond to federal plans on their own terms.

But as we worked to craft Land Back, our discussions with experts in this area revealed a clear vision of the alternative that we weren’t necessarily expecting, one rooted in cultural resurgence.

We had been planning for a very technical report revolving around legal and regulatory dispossession. Instead, our colleagues framed alienation from the land and water in terms that were decidedly more spiritual. They spoke of assimilation and how patriarchy and greed have infected our communities, taking us away from more authentic ways of relating to the land and each other.

Harold Cardinal, critical to the creation of the first Red Paper, recognized this nearly fifty years ago, writing in The Unjust Society that “the old religion of the Indian’s forefathers slowly twisted into moral positions that had little relevance to his environment, twisted to fit seemingly senseless concepts of good and bad.” Whether through residential schools, Indian Agents, or Christianization, this “twisting” manifested itself in dismantling the power of women, evacuating ceremony meant to honour the animals we hunted, and the rise of homophobia and lateral violence. And so, as Cardinal wrote then, “a return to the old values, ethics and morals of native beliefs would strengthen (our) social institutions.”

Self-determination and land back will only be effective, fair, and sustainable if they are revitalized. We do not see this as a deterministic process of one before the other, but rather as a simultaneous re-weaving ourselves back together.

The infrastructure to “legally” steal our lands is important to understand, and so are the concrete promising practices to re-assert jurisdiction, but without including a discussion on how the latter is being done in a good way, we’ll keep getting it twisted.

This report has been drafted with attention to those speaking back against the Western, masculine, and exclusionary politics and values that many in our communities have adopted and practice. We hope this follows the tradition of Indigenous women who challenged the leadership of the IAA during the era of the original Red Paper. 

Throughout the report we focus attention on the processes of those exclusions, and in the final section, we have identified cases of land and water reclamation that centre women, and to a lesser extent, queer and/or Two-Spirit individuals. We have more work to do to amplify these perspectives and experiences. After all, as our board member Emily Riddle has taught us, Indigenous governance is actually pretty gay. We have also tried to recognize young Indigenous leaders as well. The title of this report, Land Back, is a nod to the wave of emerging artists and memers finding new ways to communicate old demands.

Our times, too, are revolutionary. While tragically little has changed since 1968–1970, there are also emerging debates to reflect on and work through together. We continue to grapple with federal and provincial bureaucrats and/or industry on rights, title, and jurisdiction, but we are increasingly turning inward and are having productive conversations about what reclaiming land and water might look like, for all of us.

The following pages are brief overviews of each section in the Land Back report. Download the full report here

kropotkin1951

Edzell wrote:

laine lowe wrote:
It's a good question and probably takes some ground breaking thinking as to what would work as just reparations.

I agree but don't see much evidence of that hard thinking now or on the horizon. I'm personally quite incapable of coming up with any workable suggestion apart from sincere co-operative negotiation, but the will for that is not evident.

You have hit on the problem exactly.

Corporate Canada will never allow real sovereign rights over large tracts of unceded land. When the SCC ruled there where indigenous rights that had not been expunged including land rights the BC government started the Treaty negotiation process in 1996. It included Regional Advisory Counsels of business and civic leaders. I sat on the Lower Mainland RAC until it became very clear there were no good faith negotiations going on. The only outcome available from the government, driven by businesses at the RAC tables was "certainty" of title. That is the formal ceding of traditional territories for eternity. I heard the various nations now opposing TMX say that they would be willing to negotiate fairly for projects they supported but they would not be ceding title to land.

Many of those indigenous people are currently protesting and getting harassed and arrested as the taxpayers of this country shove a pipeline up their territories. The honour of the Crown has never shown up at the negotiation table and that is supposed to be the "Indians" protection.

Pondering

That explains why indigenous people are mounting blockades. There is no reason at all for corporations to be involved in negotiations or even express an opinion. 

NDPP

Native Genocide/Native Liberation

https://www.counterpunch.org/2021/07/02/native-genocide-native-liberation

"There were also such schools in the United States. This week, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, 'said the country would search federal boarding schools,' the Times reported, 'for possible burial sites of Native American children.' What these missionary assimilationists were doing in Canada, they were probably doing here too, namely, raping and killing indigenous children..."

cco

Trudeau condemns attacks on churches as "intolerance and racism and hatred"

Justin Trudeau wrote:
We shouldn't be lashing out at buildings that can provide solace to some of our fellow citizens. But we should be, every day, committing ourselves, each and every one of us, to the hard work that we need to do to actually rebuild a path forward that reflects the terrible intergenerational trauma and present day realities of suffering that we are all collectively responsible for.

Much like when Trudeau got caught wearing blackface and decreed that it wasn't so much him being racist as all of Canada being racist, Trudeau's perspective on Catholic and Anglican concentration camps is that everyone is responsible except the actual perpetrators. Privatize the rape, torture, and murder of children; socialize the accountability.

NDPP

'Burning down churches is not the way forward. All places of community worship must be protected...' John Horgan

https://twitter.com/ColeSayers/status/1411397474451820547

"Your government logged my family's sacred area in the old growth in Nahmint Valley. Where is your tweet denouncing your destruction of our place of worship?"

'Burn, baby burn!' - Huey Newton

Pondering

I'm an atheist. I consider religion to be nothing but fairytales that came into being to explain the unexplainable which the powerful sculped into a means of controlling people. 

I cannot understand why a single indigenous person would adopt a patriarchal white man's religion.

Emotionally I am 100% on the side of those burning the churches. I consider christian religion a bad influence on people. I would consider burning the churches as an act defending the community from an unhealthy assimilationist influence. 

Logically we can't have people going around burning down buildings no matter how offensive. Many of these churches are valued by the community as places of worship and gathering. Misguided though they may be they too have rights.  

I just hope they don't get caught and that no one gets hurt. 

bekayne

NDPP wrote:

 

'Burn, baby burn!' - Huey Newton

Does that include the Calgary Vietnamese Alliance Church?

https://calgary.ctvnews.ca/it-s-so-sad-fire-damages-southeast-calgary-ch...

Pondering

bekayne wrote:

NDPP wrote:

 

'Burn, baby burn!' - Huey Newton

Does that include the Calgary Vietnamese Alliance Church?

https://calgary.ctvnews.ca/it-s-so-sad-fire-damages-southeast-calgary-ch...

It does for me. Christianity is a major player in colonialism. Burning it down is an act of de-colonization. Maybe it will prompt an awakening in the Vietnamese community.  Christianity is not a traditional Vietnamese religion. 

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I kind of quietly agree with you, Pondering. I often cringe a bit when I see evangelical churches that are focused on one immigrant community or another. It's a form of religious colonization in my view and for the most part, started in the homelands of people who eventually immigrated to Canada.

Lots of missionary work in Asia and Latin America that has successfully established roots in the last 3 decades.  When I was in central Brazil in 2014, I was shocked by the number of storefront evangelical churches (not established denominations like Baptist or Lutheran or Anglican or Presbyterian) there were in every city, town and small village we passed through.

For me the cringe worthy reaction not only comes from the intrusion of a foreign culture but from the havoc they cause in all sorts of social aspects of life including introducing regressive ideas about sexual equality/identity and reproductive choice.

NDPP

'Leave Us in Peace Justin Trudeau'

https://twitter.com/smolgelgem/status/1413300808116936705

"Many on Twitter are outraged at Trudeau for allegedly having a 'photo shoot at an indigenous graveyard with Teddy Bear props."

Our drama teacher PM hard at work virtue signalling which continues to be the primary contemporary Canadian response to ongoing colonialism and genocide. Lots of  crocodile tears but no sovereignty and no landback.

 #landback #IndigenousSovereignty #decolonize

Edzell Edzell's picture

"It must be true, I saw it on twitter; and again on babble!"

Good grief.

zazzo

Trudeau is a fuckin' hypocrite.  https://twitter.com/AlexWellstead/status/1412590107044032517

Will this happen I wonder? Not very likely if it is left up to Trudeau.  https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/ndp-investigation-residential-schools-c...

 

NDPP

'Charlie Angus and I are calling for an independent investigation into Canada's mass crimes against our children'

https://twitter.com/DobraMichael/status/1413643324204912642

"So FN people, how do you trust Charlie to carry this task when he supported C15 with no grassroots consulation? Sounds like he is weather-vaning again. This task is too important to leave up to partisan Canadian politicians. Take it directly to the UN or to the ICC."

kropotkin1951

I have been calling for an independent UN investigation for a while now. If Mr. Angus wants to join the chorus it can only make it louder.

Edzell Edzell's picture

zazzo wrote:

Trudeau is a fuckin' hypocrite.

I guess he must have been fuckin' or he wouldn't have kids; but I'm not sure how it's relevant?

NDPP

Justin Trudeau is most definitely a fucking hypocrite. And so a pretty good fit when it comes to representing the settler-state. Can madly virtue signal 'reconciliation' while aggressively advancing  Canadian neo colonialism all at the same time.

'They stole our children to steal our land. #stoptmx"

https://twitter.com/KanahusFreedom/status/1414273876633296898

#CanadaStopStealingTheChildren #landback #decolonize

Edzell Edzell's picture

Quote:
Justin Trudeau is most definitely a fucking hypocrite.

Must be fucking right if you fucking say so. Fuck.

I think I've had enough of this semi-coherent hatefest masquerading as political insight. I think I'll execute a copulatory departure.

Fuckin' seeya, eh.

zazzo

The word 'fuckin' has come to mean in this day and age more than just the simple act of copulating.  I think they even have a youtube video explaining many of its various meanings.  Won't be seein' ya, Ed.  And I do think I was coherent, not semi-.  I think most people would get what I was trying to say, even if the language is not one that I use very often, unless I'm really really angry.

zazzo
Edzell Edzell's picture

Would be nice to see folks dicussing specific issues in an objective, open-minded way rather than just mouthing insults about people they don't like.

Pondering

Edzell wrote:

"It must be true, I saw it on twitter; and again on babble!"

Good grief.

Looks like this one was taken soon after...

https://www.gettyimages.no/detail/news-photo/canadas-prime-minister-just...

zazzo

I invite Edzell to discuss in an objective, open-minded way whether we should treat the unknown, unmarked graves of children at four former residential schools (the latest is Kuper Island, BC) as crime scenes.

NDPP

BC First Nation says more than 160 unmarked graves found

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/penelakut-kuper-resident...

"...Sxwithil'txw says additional government funding is one step in the right direction, but he would also like to see more government accountability. 'First Nations shouldn't have to pay to find their children in any way, shape or form,' he said.

'I don't see the prime minister doing much in reference to holding anybody to account other than, you know, dropping by saying a few words and putting a teddy bear down..."

[email protected]

Edzell Edzell's picture

zazzo wrote:

I invite Edzell to discuss in an objective, open-minded way whether we should treat the unknown, unmarked graves of children at four former residential schools (the latest is Kuper Island, BC) as crime scenes.

I always hope, and I mostly try, to think about things in an ojective, open minded way. But I've also been trying to avoid getting drawn into simplistic, over generalised arguments. Occasionally I make the mistake of responding 'in kind'.

@zazzo, if you or anyone posts ideas about treating unmarked graves at former residential schools as crime scenes, I'll read them with interest and maybe respond, but maybe only if such posts begin with exactly what specific action is being suggested. If you yourself want to open a discussion about that, by all means do so - but please do it on your own account.

I don't doubt that despicable crimes both literal and figurative routinely took place at those schools, and on a large scale. How 'we' could usefully deal with that here & now, and in detail, is not clear to me.

NDPP

'This is by far, the most disgusting, despicable show of hypocrisy. Canada has no shame! No conscience! Fukin genocidal monsters!!'

https://twitter.com/Terrilltf/status/1414799480503758849

"160 more found today. Carolyn Bennett and Justin Trudeau haven't really done anything substantial to help during this time. This is hard on many FNs people and it doesn't get any easier whenever new unmarked graves are found. My prayers go out to the Penelakut."

[email protected]

[email protected]

Finance and find all the dead Indigenous children Canada made and stop the genocidal policies that continue to make more might be a good start.

kropotkin1951

Edzell wrote:

I don't doubt that despicable crimes both literal and figurative routinely took place at those schools, and on a large scale. How 'we' could usefully deal with that here & now, and in detail, is not clear to me.

As I've said up thread, we need to convince the UN Security Council to appoint an International Criminal Tribunal because this is genocide and it will not be prosecuted by the perpetrators. That is the obvious next step since they have the expertise and the objectivity of non-Canadians.

Pondering

Edzell wrote:

zazzo wrote:

I invite Edzell to discuss in an objective, open-minded way whether we should treat the unknown, unmarked graves of children at four former residential schools (the latest is Kuper Island, BC) as crime scenes.

I always hope, and I mostly try, to think about things in an ojective, open minded way. But I've also been trying to avoid getting drawn into simplistic, over generalised arguments. Occasionally I make the mistake of responding 'in kind'.

@zazzo, if you or anyone posts ideas about treating unmarked graves at former residential schools as crime scenes, I'll read them with interest and maybe respond, but maybe only if such posts begin with exactly what specific action is being suggested. If you yourself want to open a discussion about that, by all means do so - but please do it on your own account.

I don't doubt that despicable crimes both literal and figurative routinely took place at those schools, and on a large scale. How 'we' could usefully deal with that here & now, and in detail, is not clear to me.

This isn't ancient history. We need a criminal investigation with orders not to destroy any documents and for the Church to hand over all documents pertaining to indigenous children. We need a public inquiry to make sure that individuals who committed crimes are held to account. 

Aside from the fact that many of these children died of abuse and neglect removing markers from gravesites is illegal. 

https://www.newsoptimist.ca/news/cowessess-chief-catholic-archdiocese-co...

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Regina confirmed that in the 1960s, a priest serving in the region had “bulldozed several grave markers” during a dispute with the Cowessess chief “in a way that we all find entirely reprehensible.”

It isn't just reprehensible it is against the law and more than several gravestones are missing so what happened to the rest?

Experts have also noted that continued searches for unmarked burials may be difficult, as many former residential schools sites 

I read somewhere that markers were removed to make the land easier and more valuable to sell. All the more criminal.  That it was done by a bunch of hypocritical clergymen only makes it worse. 

jerrym

With the discovery of the 160 undocumented and unmarked graves of the Penelakut Tribe in B.C.'s Southern Gulf Islands it is becoming increasingly obvious that we will be finding more of these tragic sites on likely something like a weekly basis for at least several months. The schools not only attempted to the Indian out of the child, they attempted to take out the Indian period. 

A  Kuper Island Industrial School residential school (the site of the most recent unmarked grave discovery) survivor, Steve Sxwithul'txw, said "I don't see the prime minister doing much in reference to holding anybody to account other than, you know, dropping by and saying a few words and putting a teddy bear down." (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/penelakut-kuper-resident...) Steve Sxwithul'txw went on to say there needs to be a lot more accountability not just by the Catholic Church, but also by the federal government. 

NDPP

This entire country is haunted.

https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/this-entire-country-is-haunted/

"...But the reality is this entire country is haunted by the violence enacted to create what we now call 'Canada.' These acts were done on behalf of every non-Indigenous family who proudly calls themselves Canadians, because this is what its leaders deemed necessary to carve out this colonial, capitalist nation from the already occupied land it once was.

We can no longer ignore the human cost of creating this haunted nation. In fact, we must remember. The question is: what, if anything, will this country, its leaders and its citizens do to actually show that they've changed?"

NDPP

'Tk'emlups te Secwepemc Kukpi7 (Chief) Roseanne Casimir says that residential school attendance records are in the possession of the Canadian government. She calls on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to share the records.'

https://twitter.com/cblackst/status/1415718778319605770

"Dear Justin Trudeau: Supporting Chief Casimir's call for Canada to share all records in its possession."

And I.

[email protected]

NDPP

BC Civil Liberties Association Leader Resigns...

https://twitter.com/farrahsafiakhan/status/1416812020696076293

"Harsha Walia came under fire for a tweet saying 'Burn it all down', after deliberately set fires destroyed two Roman Catholic churches..."

Ken Burch

Edzell wrote:

Quote:
Justin Trudeau is most definitely a fucking hypocrite.

Must be fucking right if you fucking say so. Fuck.

I think I've had enough of this semi-coherent hatefest masquerading as political insight. I think I'll execute a copulatory departure.

Fuckin' seeya, eh.

Spare us- the only reason you ever joined this board was to make a display of fauxrage and then flounce off.   

bekayne

NDPP wrote:

BC Civil Liberties Association Leader Resigns...

https://twitter.com/farrahsafiakhan/status/1416812020696076293

"Harsha Walia came under fire for a tweet saying 'Burn it all down', after deliberately set fires destroyed two Roman Catholic churches..."

Are Coptic Churches (like the one destroyed in Surrey this morning) included in "burn it all down"?

zazzo

The two churches that were burnt down were situated on First Nation communities.  There is some debate on who would choose to burn down churches on reserve land. Some say that it could be non-Indigenous people who want to deflect the public's concern over the unmarked graves to a different direction.  No one can say for sure either way until an investigation is complete. 

As for Harsha Walia's comment, 'Burn it all down', I would say that in the heat of the moment we have all said something similar, but for the BCCLA to accept or encourage her resignation shows a lack of support for their ED who is a woman of colour, and has done much good work in social justice.  The sad irony is that in their press release they outline some of the work that she has done.  She will move on, maybe rest awhile, and continue.  I hope so, anyway.  The other thing to note is that all previous EDs listed on their website were male. Makes you kind of wonder though....

NDPP

'Burn it all down' is a call for Decolonization, Not Arson.'

https://twitter.com/Nehiyahskwew/status/1415495475483090944

BC Civil Liberties Assn has long been unduly sensitive to the influence of the BC NDP, including a longstanding refusal to support the international demand  for a public inquiry into the Gustafsen Lake affair,  because of the involvement of NDP notables.  There were signs under Walia, that a truly effective and independent human rights organization, accountable to people not politics was beginning to emerge. Sadly no surprise to see enemies within and without finally found an issue with which to push her out.

Edzell Edzell's picture

zazzo wrote:

for the BCCLA to accept or encourage her resignation shows a lack of support for their ED who is a woman of colour, and has done much good work in social justice.

That's precisely the sort of thing I referred to, in my so gleefully and stupidly ridiculed topic "Political over-correctness." What fools are on here. (You wern't one of them? I know KrakPotkin was a ringleader)

kropotkin1951

Edzell wrote:

zazzo wrote:

for the BCCLA to accept or encourage her resignation shows a lack of support for their ED who is a woman of colour, and has done much good work in social justice.

That's precisely the sort of thing I referred to, in my so gleefully and stupidly ridiculed topic "Political over-correctness." What fools are on here. (You wern't one of them? I know KrakPotkin was a ringleader)

LMAOROF

So Edzell do you think that encouraging arson is acceptable. Personally I think that I would support her right to say it and I understand her sentiment completely and agree with it. However I have sat as a Director on numerous boards and the ED represents the institution and therefore they should be more temperate. Only the people in the organization will know whether she left because she felt compromised after making a major faux pas or because she was pushed out of the job for something that was not a firing offense.

Lots of possibilities in the story so maybe you could elaborate on why you see this a perfect example of your newly minted idea of POC thinking. Just asking for a Prince of a fellow.

NDPP

Hashtag#IStandWithHarsha Shows Support For Former Civil Liberties Association Executive Director Harsha Walia

https://www.straight.com/news/hashtag-istandwithharsha-shows-support-for...

"...But the reality is that the board of directors did not defend Walia for using a phrase - 'burn it all down' - that's been employed many times in the past as a metaphor for dismantling structures of oppression against marginalized people..."

 

"I trust the next head of BCCLA will follow through on the organization's promise to us - to defend our free expression rights against Indian Act government. If they don't then burn it all down - them and the people who were cheerleaders for this putsch."

NDP 'friendlies'...

https://twitter.com/rjjago/status/1416259465926615042

Edzell Edzell's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Edzell wrote:

zazzo wrote:

for the BCCLA to accept or encourage her resignation shows a lack of support for their ED who is a woman of colour, and has done much good work in social justice.

That's precisely the sort of thing I referred to, in my so gleefully and stupidly ridiculed topic "Political over-correctness." What fools are on here. (You wern't one of them? I know KrakPotkin was a ringleader)

LMAOROF

So Edzell do you think that encouraging arson is acceptable. Personally I think that I would support her right to say it and I understand her sentiment completely and agree with it. However I have sat as a Director on numerous boards and the ED represents the institution and therefore they should be more temperate. Only the people in the organization will know whether she left because she felt compromised after making a major faux pas or because she was pushed out of the job for something that was not a firing offense.

Lots of possibilities in the story so maybe you could elaborate on why you see this a perfect example of your newly minted idea of POC thinking. Just asking for a Prince of a fellow.

Try to stop being so stupid. I know it's a stretch but maybe deep down there's some latent intelligence.

Sorry about your ass falling off. Were you on a board at the time?

By the way, you're a disgrace to Kropotkin's name.

kropotkin1951

So just as I thought you will not engage in any discussion of an actual topic. I've tried numerous times in this and other threads. Here is from up thread.

Edzell wrote:

I don't doubt that despicable crimes both literal and figurative routinely took place at those schools, and on a large scale. How 'we' could usefully deal with that here & now, and in detail, is not clear to me.

As I've said up thread, we need to convince the UN Security Council to appoint an International Criminal Tribunal because this is genocide and it will not be prosecuted by the perpetrators. That is the obvious next step since they have the expertise and the objectivity of non-Canadians.

The next response you gave in this thread about the genocide of indigenous children is this piece of shit.

zazzo wrote:

for the BCCLA to accept or encourage her resignation shows a lack of support for their ED who is a woman of colour, and has done much good work in social justice.

That's precisely the sort of thing I referred to, in my so gleefully and stupidly ridiculed topic "Political over-correctness." What fools are on here. (You wern't one of them? I know KrakPotkin was a ringleader)

Pondering

Edzell wrote:

zazzo wrote:

for the BCCLA to accept or encourage her resignation shows a lack of support for their ED who is a woman of colour, and has done much good work in social justice.

That's precisely the sort of thing I referred to, in my so gleefully and stupidly ridiculed topic "Political over-correctness." What fools are on here. (You wern't one of them? I know KrakPotkin was a ringleader)

None of us give a shit what a pompous ass thinks of us. 

NDPP

Canada-Israel: 'Shared Values'

https://twitter.com/wmadxyn/status/1419255190289592329

"A country with a history of mass graves for children would certainly have 'shared values' with one that shoots kids in the back."

The Canadian settler-state has quietly achieved what the Israeli one can only dream of...

#CanadaKidKiller #UsurpationAsGenocide #IndigenousSovereignty #Landback #Decolonize

kropotkin1951

This open letter is very good and helped me understand why the board over reacted.

https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/ubcic/pages/4436/attachments/origi...

 

NDPP

See also #189, #192

NDPP

Millions meant for residential school survivors spent on Catholic Church lawyers, administration: documents

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/residential-school-survivors-ca...

"Documents obtained by CBC News detail long list of alleged violations of survivor agreement by church..."

These things happen:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57981508

NDPP

Residential Schools are a stain on Canada's history that won't be erased simply by appointing an Indigenous Governor General [MUST READ]

https://on.rt.com/bdf0

"...In spite of this being raised for decades, and largely ignored in media, recent months have seen interest rise around the globe. After publishing my thoughts on the matter I received an email from Roland Chrisjohn, a PhD-educated clinical psychologist. He is also a professor heading the Native Studies department at St Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick. 

His email is lengthy, for good reason..."

 

Roland Chrisjohn on the barbaric 'residential schools' & Canada's coverup of murder and torture.

https://youtu.be/fibNBUrtEeA

"You don't dig 10,000 graves without knowing about it..."

 

jerrym

The Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations, together with the Catholic Church, are going to investigate what happened in a North Vancouver residential school called St. Paul’s Indian Residential School.

The Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations, along with the Catholic Archdiocese, will be launching an investigation into a former residential school in North Vancouver.

Khelsilem (Dustin Rivers), the spokesperson for the Squamish Nation Council, said Tuesday morning this work is about protecting and helping survivors of the former St. Paul’s Indian Residential School.

The investigation will include looking at who attended the school, what happened there, and who did not make it home, as well as any unmarked or undocumented burial sites.

“This work is very important,” said Chief Jen Thomas of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, whose father attended the school. “To think of that, that wasn’t even that long ago and if he didn’t survive, I wouldn’t be here.”

The St. Paul’s Indian Residential School operated from 1889 to 1959 and was the only residential school in Metro Vancouver.

According to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, students from the following bands attended the IRS: Burrard #3; Musqueam; Nanaimo; Squamish; Squamish River; Creekside; Squamish #1 (Mission Reserve); Squamish #5 (Capilano Reserve); Mount Currie; Cape Mudge; Skwah; Chehalis; Chilliwack; and Burrard. The Government of Canada was responsible for funding the school, which was managed and operated by the Roman Catholic Religious Teaching Order, the Sisters of Child Jesus. The Nations said more than 2,000 Indigenous children, representing six generations of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, and səl̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ Nations, and other Indigenous communities, were institutionalized at St. Paul’s from grades one through eight.

They said many of those children were then relocated to the Kamloops Indian Residential School, where the remains of at least 215 children were confirmed this May. Oral histories told by St. Paul’s survivors include stories about children who disappeared.

According to public records, 12 unidentified students died while attending St. Paul’s between 1904 and 1913. The Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw’s goal with the investigation of the former residential school site, located within Squamish unceded territory, is to find the location of each of these children and bring them home to rest.

“It’s important to note that our People’s experiences with St. Paul’s Indian Residential School are well known and healing is needed to move forward. This work is being done to respect and address both known and unknown knowledge, and is a critical part of reconciliation,” Khelsilem said.

Records kept by the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at UBC said the school was described as a “death trap” and a “fire trap” by the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia in 1933. In addition, two pupils were hospitalized with smallpox in 1929. In 1931, the local Indian Agent reported after an inspection that he suspected the children at Squamish were not being fed properly. In 1935, the school was the site of a chickenpox epidemic and according to these records, it was very overcrowded in the 1950s. ...

James Borkowski, from the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vancouver, said Tuesday morning that church members have worked with members of the Squamish Nation over the past few months. “We are grateful to the Squamish Nation for allowing us to collaborate in a small way,” he said. “We have much to learn and act on as we hear from the nations and community members in this journey of truth and reconciliation related to the church’s historic and damaging role with residential schools.” ...

To date, the number of remains reported to be found across the country totals well over 1,000.

https://globalnews.ca/news/8100397/st-pauls-residential-school-north-van...

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