No ketchup in the future, according to comedy film 'James vs. His Future Self'

The rabble podcast network offers an alternative take on politics, entertainment, society, stories, community and life in general. All opinions belong to the podcaster; however, podcasters are expected to adhere to our guidelines. We welcome new podcasters -- contact us for details.

Please chip in to support more articles like this. Support rabble.ca for as little as $5 per month!

Image: Northern Banner Releasing. Used with permission.

It's tempting sometimes to want to be anywhere but where you are in the present moment.  The film James vs. His Future Self is a futuristic story which explores why this isn't such a good idea, especially when there's a chance your present self will run into your future self.

When an uptight time-travelling obsessed young scientist is visited by his nihilistic future self, he's told that he needs to give up his dream of becoming the world's first time traveler, or else. But when he won't go along with the plan, it becomes a wicked battle of man versus himself -- literally.

Jonas Chernick is James, a brilliant and obsessed particle physicist on the brink of inventing time travel who, in the process, has relegated the only two people who care about him to the sidelines. Daniel Stern, today's Face2Face guest, plays the part of Jimmy. Jimmy is the future, time-travelling version of James, now angry, cynical and driven by regret and loss. Jimmy's obsessed with righting the wrongs of his life by convincing his younger self to give up his obsession with time travel and to finally stop and smell the roses. Or else.

Is the future inevitable? Or can Jimmy change James's course? Daniel Stern and Face2Face host David Peck talk about the film and explores a wide variety of themes -- sculpting, good conversation, staying focused, regret and living in the moment, and why there's no ketchup in the future.

Directed by Jeremy LaLonde (Cinequest best comedy award-winner The Go-Getters, Slamdance hit and Canadian Film Fest award-winner How to Plan an Orgy in a Small Town) and co-written by LaLonde and Chernick, James vs His Future Self is an existential twist on the time-traveller-arrives-to-save-the-future trope. An homage to the classic sci-fi rom-coms of the '80s and '90s, a la Back to the FutureJames vs His Future Self is a rare Canadian indie film filled with raunchy humour, heartfelt romance, surprising twists and packed with noteworthy performances. It was shot in Sudbury.

About today's guest:

Daniel Stern recently completed a major arc playing Aidy Bryant's (SNL) father in the Hulu comedy series Shrill, produced by Lorne Michaels. Stern can also now be seen starring in Game Over Man! opposite Adam Devine, Anders Holm and Blake Anderson in the Kyle Newacheck-directed Netflix feature. Stern appears on Judd Apatow's Netflix series Love and previously co-starred in WGN's Manhattan, and feature films including DinerIt's My TurnBreaking Away, and the City Slickers and Home Alone franchises.

Image: Northern Banner Releasing. Used with permission.

F2F Music: David Peck and Face2Face.

For more information about David Peck's podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here. With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

 

Thank you for reading this story…

More people are reading rabble.ca than ever and unlike many news organizations, we have never put up a paywall – at rabble we’ve always believed in making our reporting and analysis free to all, while striving to make it sustainable as well. Media isn’t free to produce. rabble’s total budget is likely less than what big corporate media spend on photocopying (we kid you not!) and we do not have any major foundation, sponsor or angel investor. Our main supporters are people and organizations -- like you. This is why we need your help. You are what keep us sustainable.

rabble.ca has staked its existence on you. We live or die on community support -- your support! We get hundreds of thousands of visitors and we believe in them. We believe in you. We believe people will put in what they can for the greater good. We call that sustainable.

So what is the easy answer for us? Depend on a community of visitors who care passionately about media that amplifies the voices of people struggling for change and justice. It really is that simple. When the people who visit rabble care enough to contribute a bit then it works for everyone.

And so we’re asking you if you could make a donation, right now, to help us carry forward on our mission. Make a donation today.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.