Columnists
A mural of Hugo Chávez in Mérida city. Image: Wikimedia Commons/David Hernández​
Rick Salutin | What now for Chavez’s children? Events in Venezuela are the latest points of light for young, left-wing idealists to fade.
News
Image: Flickr/Joka Madruga
Cory Collins | Amidst a dire economic situation and Rousseff's suspension in Brazil, Venezuela declares a state of emergency and accuses the U.S. of a coup plot.
News
Photo: flickr/matthewvenn
COHA staff | COHA staff offer an analysis on the violence perpetrated against the democratically elected government and civilians in Venezuela.
Blog
John Baglow | Venezuela is again in the news as demonstrations by pro- and anti-government forces take place. But the foreign press is taking extreme liberties with the images it is using to represent the conflict.
Blog
Ezra Levant and Michael Coren
David J. Climenhaga | Not done in Canada, you say? Oh yes it is! If the recently dead political figure is someone on the left, one can say pretty much whatever one feels like.
News
Billboard in Havana, Cuba. (Photo: Nueva Perspectiva / flickr)
Michael Carr | One month after the death of revolutionary leader and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez on March 5, the outpouring of love, respect and solidarity for Chavez continues.
Blog
Nobody's accusing Adrian Dix of planning Chavez-like policies. That's a shame.
Derrick O'Keefe | The mainstream media and corporate elite appear to be much less alarmed about the prospect of a B.C. NDP win than in the past.
Columnists
Murray Dobbin | Harper and other Western leaders' reaction to Chavez and his legacy is an important revelation regarding their visceral hostility to using state power in the interests of the poor.
Blog
Photo: Bernardo Londoy/Flickr
Gerry Caplan | It is a phenomenon rarely noted that virtually every left-wing government since the Second World War, almost all of them elected, has faced vicious, sometimes violent, obstruction by its enemies.
Blog
rabble staff | Topics of discussion on rabble.ca's discusion forum, babble.
Columnists
Thomas Ponniah | Chávez will not be remembered simply as a politician who alleviated his country's rate of poverty. Instead he will be reminisced as a man, and perhaps already as a legend, who empowered the poor.
Columnists
Linda McQuaig | What appears to have infuriated the western establishment was Hugo Chavez's audacity in challenging -- and scoring some victories against -- western dominance of the world economy.