News
rabble staff | The Globe and Mail leaders' debate is today! Watch rabble's live coverage of the debate right here.
Blog
Photo: Guillaume Paumier/flickr
various | The economy is one of the most critical ballot-box issues facing Canadian voters this election. CCPA staff share the questions they would like the leaders to answer tonight.
News
Karl Nerenberg | Last time, in August, Trudeau let Harper off the hook when he chose to turn fire on his fellow opposition leader. What will he do this time?
News
Photo: flickr/ Robert Fairchild
Paul Weinberg | None of the major political parties are addressing income inequality head-on in their platforms. With economic growth decreasing and the wage gap increasing, we need to talk about Canada's economy.
Blog
Maya Bhullar | As the debate over economic policies heat up, here are some resources to help inform the argument.
Columnists
Jim Stanford | This week Stephen Harper's Conservatives are trumpeting the announcement of a small surplus for fiscal year 2014-15. Here's why it doesn't represent a "triumph of good fiscal management."
Columnists
Duncan Cameron | It's official: the Canadian economy is in recession. By election day, parties can expect millions of voters to be paying attention to what governments plan to do to create jobs and secure employment.
Blog
Iglika Ivanova | Canada is officially in a recession and while B.C. is expected to sail through it relatively unscathed, the projected modest GDP growth performance does not seem to be translating into job gains.
Blog
Photo: Alexandre Normand/flickr
Seth Klein | Which opposition party, with a potential to win the election, has the better platform when it comes to tackling climate change and inequality? Seth Klein weighs the parties on these core issues.
Columnists
Jim Stanford | Now that the recession has been confirmed, let's hope the election campaign now starts to address some of the deeper challenges facing Canada's economy.
Blog
Photo: KMR Photography/flickr
David Macdonald | Does the fact that we're in recession mean we can finally focus on the non-recovery of the job market or the fact that jobs are far more precarious than they have been in years? Let's hope so.
Blog
Photo: Yasmeen/flickr
Iglika Ivanova | The dip in GDP is what's making the headlines, but there are three other trends in the new data released by StatsCan that suggest the economic slowdown is here to stay.