Notes from Quebec by Ethan Cox

Ethan Cox's picture
rabble's Quebec correspondent, Ethan Cox is a 29 year-old journo, pundit and incorrigible rabble rouser from Montreal. A former union organizer and student union executive, Ethan has also worked on a number of successful municipal and federal election campaigns, and was a member of Quebec central office staff for the NDP in the 2011 election. More recently he served as Quebec Director and Senior Communications Advisor on Brian Topp's NDP leadership campaign. He now spends his time writing for rabble, freelancing for outlets like the National Post, appearing regularly on CJAD radio in Montreal and working on a book about austerity. You can follow him on twitter @EthanCoxMtl

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights criticizes Quebec

| June 18, 2012
UN HIgh Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay

Quebec students and allies outraged over the repressive and anti-democratic nature of Bill 78, its municipal companion Bylaw P-6, and other extreme police tactics, including political profiling and preventative arrests, are about to get some very heavy duty backup.

One might even say vindication?

In an opening address to be delivered Monday to the 47 member UN Human Rights Council, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay will express her "alarm" at ongoing attempts to restrict freedom of assembly in Quebec.

Her speech, a draft copy of which was obtained by UN Watch, will also express "concern" over similar restrictions in Russia (Russia's law limiting protest was passed shortly after Bill 78, prompting some to speculate it was modeled on Quebec's legislation) and "deep concern" over such restrictions in Eritrea.

In diplomatic terms alarm is a far more severe word than concern, making Canada's restrictions on protest the most troubling to the UN agency.

In a speech running to several pages in length, and highlighting human rights issues in dozens of countries, the situation in Quebec warrants a single, albeit explosive, paragraph.

"Moves to restrict freedom of assembly continue to alarm me, as is the case in the province of Quebec in Canada in the context of students’ protests"

UPDATE: The wording she used in the speech today was slightly different, and perhaps even harsher, and is as follows:

"Moves to restrict freedom of assembly in many parts of the world are alarming. In the context of student protests, I am disappointed by the new legislation passed in Quebec that restricts their rights to freedom of association and of peaceful assembly.”

This expression of alarm will likely lead to Canada's inclusion on the UN watchlist of countries which the agency believes are not upholding their international obligations with respect to human rights, a list which includes Syria, Zimbabwe and Pakistan.

UN Watch, an organization best known for attacking any criticism of Israel by the UN as anti-Semitic or disproportionate, dedicated most of their release announcing the leaked speech to attacking Pillay's criticism of Canada in similar terms.

It criticized Pillay for mentioning Canada, but not the situation in China or Cuba, and concluded that "...the UN commissioner is making a big mistake by sending the message that countries that have blots on their system - if indeed the Quebec law is a blot - are even worse than countries where the blot is the system".

But of course she is sending no such message, and the inference that she is is a convenient fiction. It does not follow that anyone who has the temerity to mention the situation in Canada, or Palestine, is in some way delegitimizing the serious human rights threats faced in any other country.

The speech's focus on Canada, Russia and Eritrea is in response to recent developments in these countries. It seems more than logical to focus on developing threats to human rights, rather than rehashing criticisms of countries like China, which the UN agency has severely criticized on many occasions in the past.

It is a particularly rich criticism of a speech where attention is paid to human rights situations in over a dozen countries, and Canada occupies only one paragraph.

Un Watch are correct that Canada has a much better reputation on human rights than many other countries, which makes it all the more alarming, and demanding of international attention, that we are now taking such a significant step backwards in our dedication to these rights.

The truth is that many in this country have done their best to bury their head in the sand as the situation in Quebec has descended into what can only be described as repression. Ask anyone if they approve of preventative arrest, profiling people for detention on the basis of a political symbol, mass arrests of peaceful protesters or indiscriminate use of force by police and their answer will be an emphatic no.

But our concern for fellow human beings in countries like Russia, China and Saudi Arabia seems to end at our shores. Call it denial, perhaps we simply can't accept that such things are happening here in Canada, but the silence in the media and among the population at large has been deafening.

It is no exaggeration to say that the situation in Quebec is the most serious threat to our fundamental rights, as articulated in the Quebec and Canadian Charter, and the International Declaration of Human Rights, that we have seen in decades.

That is why the Quebec Bar Association, representing the province's lawyers and prosecutors, has taken the unprecedented step of condemning Bill 78. It's why over six hundred lawyers in full robes took to the streets of Montreal to protest the situation, a first in Quebec history.

It's time to take our heads out of the sand and give them a stiff shake. Edmund Burke said "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men (sic) to do nothing", and right now there are an awful lot of good men and women doing nothing.

Our rights are not ironclad, they depend on our vigilance against even seemingly minor assaults. In this case we should be able to find common cause across partisan or ideological lines. This is not a left-right issue, but an assault on freedoms we all hold dear.

With her criticism, and Canada's inclusion on the UN watchlist, Ms. Pillay has shone a light on our situation. What's happening in Quebec is now the talk of the international community, Jean Charest our international embarrassment.

We need to take a stand, and send a message to the authoritarian-minded among our leaders that any erosion of our rights will be met with stiff resistance.

Pundits on the right love to invoke the sacrifices of our soldiers. Well, our soldiers died in two World Wars for the rights and freedoms we enjoy, and which we have chosen to codify in our Constitution. Many also died defending these rights at other times in our history, such as during the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919, or the red scare of the 1950s.

Our rights were not granted, they were taken. Fought for over generations. They come to us drenched in the blood of our forebears who laid down their lives for them. A moments inattention and decades of blood, sweat and tears can be taken from us, without our noticing our neck is slit until we turn our head.

"To you from failing hands we throw the torch; be yours to hold it high" goes the famous line from In Flanders Fields. Will we be the generation which allows that torch to fall? Our brave youth are in the streets of Quebec every night, paying the price to stand against an unjust law. They need our help.

If there was any doubt in our minds that what is going on in Quebec is a grave threat to our most basic liberties, the attention of the UN should serve as a wake up call.

The question is, what are we going to do about it?

We go where the mainstream media fear to tread. We live by that old, and forgotten, journalistic credo to: "afflict the powerful and comfort the afflicted". But it can't happen without your support. Please consider becoming a member of rabble.ca for as little as $5 a month, and get a free subscription to one of ten great magazines.

You can also follow me on Twitter: @EthanCoxMTL

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Thanks Unionist! The question is somewhat rhetorical. The answer I'm pushing for is for people to participate in Casseroles Night in Canada on Friday for starters, in solidarity with massive demonstrations in Montreal and Quebec City. I was just a little tired of all my pieces being promos for CNIC!

 

Good article, Ethan. And I'd love to see a follow-up where you answer the question in your last paragraph.

As for Mount Royal, I actually experienced a frisson of relief on election night when Saulie Zajdel didn't win. Everything is relative.

 

Not at all unfortunately. Mount Royal is probably the most right wing riding in Quebec. (Assuming voters in the Beauce are more motivated by family loyalty to the Berniers than love for Maxime's politics).

In the last election the NDP had a significant campaign there, with a well known and respected candidate, and still got less than 18%, making it the worst result for the NDP in the province. The fight was between Cotler and Conservative Saulie Zajdel, who accused Cotler of anti-Semitism of all things for not being sufficiently Zionist...

Very rich, largely anglophone, very conservative riding...

UN Watch is funded by the American Jewish Committee, a rabidly pro-Zionist organization.

"UN Watch is an organisation whose main purpose is to attack the United Nations in general, and its human rights council in particular, for alleged bias against Israel."

Well-known Zionist Quebec MP Irwin Cotler is on the Board of Directors of UN Watch. I wonder how interested his constituents would be in his apparent collaboration with right-wing opposition to the Maple Spring?

 

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