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The "Ugly Canadian" is on the march, Trudeau is its new face

Chilean protest materials against Barrick Gold's Pascua Lama mine. Image: Imagenes de luz/flickr

The "Ugly Canadian" is on the march, but now with a much prettier face at the helm. Across the planet, Canadian mining companies are in conflict with local communities and usually have the Trudeau government's support.

A slew of disputes have arisen at Canadian run mines in recent weeks:

Last week in northern central Mexico, community members blockaded the main access road to Goldcorp Inc.'s Penasquito mine. They are protesting against the Vancouver-based company for using and contaminating their water without providing alternative sources.

In Northern Ireland two weeks ago, police forced activists out of a Cookstown hotel after they tried to confront representatives from Dalradian Resources. Community groups worry the Toronto firm's proposed gold and silver mine will damage the Owenkillew River Special Area of Conservation.

Last weekend, an Argentinian senator denounced Blue Sky Uranium's exploration in the Patagonia region. Magdalena Odarda said residents living near the planned mine fear the Vancouver company's operations will harm their health.

On Wednesday more than 40 US congresspeople, as well as the Alaska's Governor, criticized the removal of restrictions on mining in Alaska's Bristol Bay region, home to half the world's sockeye salmon production. In May, Northern Dynasty CEO Thomas Collier met the new head of the US Environmental Protection Agency to ask for the lifting of restrictions on its Pebble Mine, which is expected to destroy the region's salmon fishery. In a bid to gain government permission to move forward on the project, the Vancouver firm appointed a former chief of staff at the US Department of the Interior as its new CEO.

At the end of September, hundreds of families were displaced by the Filipino Army to make way for a mine jointly run by Australian and Canadian firms MRL Gold and Egerton Gold. The community in the Batangas Province was blocking a project expected to harm marine biodiversity.

In eastern Madagascar, farmers are in a dispute with DNI Metals over compensation for lands damaged by the Toronto firm.

In August, another person was allegedly killed by Acacia (Barrick Gold) security at its North Mara mine in Tanzania.

Last week, Barrick Gold agreed to pay $20-million to a Chilean a group after a year-long arbitration. The Toronto company had reneged on a $60-million 20-year agreement to compensate communities affected by its Pascua Lama gold, silver and copper project.

In mid-September, Eldorado Gold threatened to suspend its operations in Halkidiki, Greece, if the central government didn't immediately approve permits for its operations. With the local Mayor and most of the community opposed to the mine, the social-democratic Syriza government was investigating whether a flawed technical study by the Vancouver company was a breach of its contract.

And in Guatemala, Indigenous protestors continue to blockade Tahoe Resources' Escobal silver mine despite a mid-September court decision in the company's favour. Fearing for their water, health and land, eight municipalities in the area have voted against the Vancouver firm's project.

The Liberals have largely maintained Stephen Harper's aggressive support for Canada's massive international mining industry. Last month Canada's Trade Minister François-Philippe Champagne backed El Dorado, denouncing the Greek government's "troublesome" permit delays. Canada's Ambassador to Madagascar, Sandra McCadell, appears to have backed DNI Metals during a meeting with that country's mining minister.

As I detailed previously, the Trudeau government recently threw diplomatic weight behind Canada's most controversial mining company in the country where it has committed its worst abuses. Amidst dozens of deaths at Barrick Gold's North Mara mine in Tanzania and an escalating battle over the company's unpaid royalties/tax, Canada's High Commissioner Ian Myles organised a meeting between Barrick Executive Chairman John Thornton and President John Magufuli. After the meeting Myles applauded Barrick's commitment to "the highest standards, fairness and respect for laws and corporate social responsibility."

Two years into their mandate the Trudeau regime has yet to follow through on their repeated promises to rein in Canada's controversial international mining sector. Despite this commitment, they have adopted no measures to restrict public support for Canadian mining companies responsible for significant abuses abroad.

The 'Ugly Canadian' is running roughshod across the globe and pretty boy Justin is its new face.

Image: Imagenes de luz/flickr

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