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Insiders suppress 'Palestine Resolution' at NDP convention

Shaw convention centre in Ottawa. Photo: Jennifer Tweedie/flickr

They came, mostly young people, to fight for justice. They came to support the rule of international law, to help solve a long-standing injustice through non-violent means; they came to tell an oppressed people you have not been forgotten; they came to do what is right for a left-wing political party; they came to speak truth to power.

And how did the left-wing party respond? By using backroom arm-twisting, opaque block-voting and procedural manoeuvring to prevent debate. Silence in class!

While NDP insiders may feel they dodged the "Palestine Resolution" bullet at their recent convention, party members may come to regret their undemocratic moves. Their suppression of debate might stir rage against the machine. At a minimum it has provoked many to ask why.

Why, when the Palestine Resolution was endorsed unanimously by the NDP youth convention and by over 25 riding associations, did the powers that be not want it even discussed?

Given the resolution mostly restated official Canadian policy, except that it called for "banning settlement products from Canadian markets, and using other forms of diplomatic and economic pressure to end the occupation" one can only assume that the party either supports the indefinite Israeli occupation of Palestinian land or has some sort of problem with boycotts and economic sanctions. Clearly the NDP is not against boycotts and economic sanctions in principle since they've recently supported these measures against Russia, Venezuela and elsewhere.

If after a half-century of illegal occupation, one can't call for boycotting Israeli settlement goods, then when? After a century? Two?

Or is the problem the particular country to be boycotted? Does the NDP hierarchy believe that anti-Semitism can be the only possible motivation for putting economic pressure on Israel to accept a Palestinian state? Or perhaps it is simply a worry that the mainstream media would attack the party?

Whatever the ideological reason, the bottom line is the Palestine Resolution was buried to ensure it wouldn't be discussed. When its proponents sought to push it up the priority list at an early morning session before the main plenary, the party hierarchy blocked it. In a poorly publicized side room meeting they succeeded 200 to 189. NDP House Leader Guy Caron mobilized current and former MPs, including Murray Rankin, Randall Garrison, Craig Scott, Tracey Ramsey, Alexandre Boulerice, Hélène Laverdière, Nathan Cullen and others, to vote against debating the most widely endorsed foreign policy resolution at the convention. Niki Ashton was the only MP to support re-prioritizing the Palestine Resolution.

Apparently, the party leadership discussed how to counter the resolution at two meetings before the convention. In a comment on a Guardian story about the need for the NDP to move left, Tom Allen, a staffer for Windsor Tecumseth NDP MP Cheryl Hardcastle, describes "panicked" planning to defeat the resolution. "As for the part about the 'party establishment (being) easily able to deflect challenges from the left.' I would respectfully submit that this is wrong. As an NDP staffer I can tell you that it wasn't easy at all this time and, especially with regards to the 'Palestinian Resolution,' which required a great deal of panicked last minute organizing to defeat (and only then by a close margin)."

Why would the party establishment risk turning off so many young activists, exactly the sort of member new leader Jagmeet Singh claims he wants to attract?

A quick look at some of the more prominent supporters of shutting down debate suggests an answer.

Victoria area MPs Randall Garrison (defence critic) and Murray Rankin (justice critic) who voted against debating the Palestine Resolution are members of the Canada Israel Inter-Parliamentary Group and took a Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs paid trip to Israel in 2016. After the IDF slaughtered 2,200 Palestinians in Gaza in the summer of 2014, Rankin offered words of encouragement to an emergency fundraiser for Israel.

Party foreign critic Hélène Laverdière, who voted to suppress the Palestine Resolution, took a paid trip to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee's conference in Washington in 2016 and participated in a Jewish National Fund event in Israel.

British Columbia liaison and critic for democratic institutions, Nathan Cullen also voted against debating the Palestine Resolution. "I am strongly in support of Israel," said Cullen in a 2016 statement about how people should be allowed to criticize that country. In 2014-15 Cullen's office took in Daniel Gans through CIJA's Parliamentary Internship Program, which pays pro-Israel university students $10,000 to work for parliamentarians (Gans then worked as parliamentary assistant to NDP MP Finn Donnelly). In 2014 Cullen met representatives of CIJA Pacific Region to talk about Israel, Iran and other subjects. According to CIJA's summary of the meeting, "Mr. Cullen understood the importance of a close Canada-Israel relationship."

Just before the convention the President of the Windsor-Tecumseh Federal NDP, Noah Tepperman, sent out an email to all riding associations calling on them to oppose Palestine resolutions. In it he claimed, "boycotts based on religion, nationality or place of origin directly contravene the spirit of inclusiveness to which we in the NDP are committed." He further alluded to an anti-Jewish agenda by connecting the different solidarity resolutions to "a backdrop of already-high-and-rising antisemitism here in Canada as well as abroad." But, Tepperman sits on the board of the Windsor Jewish National Fund, which I've argued is an openly racist organization.

The truth is pro-Israel-no-matter-what-it-does NDP members in positions of power within the party won a narrow battle. How the war goes will depend on the lessons learned by those seeking a party that's an instrument of real change, that fights against all forms of racism and oppression.

Photo: Jennifer Tweedie/flickr

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