What can we do to support World Day for Decent Work

The Canadian Labour Congress and unions across the country just sent out a press release announcing that October 7, 2017 is the 10th anniversary of the World Day for Decent Work.

Decent work is defined 1) as access for all workers to quality jobs, diginity, equality and safe working conditions and 2) putting workers at the centre of development and giving them a voice in what they do. 

The Canadian Labour Congress has outlined steps Canada needs to take in a letter to Prime Minister Trudeau, outlining several steps the federal government can take to ensure better access to decent work at home and abroad.  You can read these recommendations below, and support some of the actions unions and their members are demanding

According to the CLC/CTC, our federal government can:

  • Ensure the creation of high-quality jobs needed by millions of unemployed, underemployed, and precariously-employed workers in Canada.
  • Promote and uphold collective bargaining rights at home and abroad.
  • Restore the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour, indexing it to wage growth, and bring back full employment as a primary policy target.
  • Create public employment programs for regions and populations with high unemployment or a high concentration of low-wage workers. That should include job creation programs for youth, Indigenous and Northern communities, newcomers to Canada, Alberta and the Atlantic provinces;
  • Use all available tools to eliminate discrimination in hiring, promotion, and pay, including strengthening the Employment Equity Act and the Federal Contractors Program;
  • End the systematic violation of migrant workers’ rights by abolishing tied work permits and implementing a proactive compliance assessment and enforcement regime;
  • Promote fairness by tightening regulations on hours of work and scheduling;
  • Increase staffing, training and resources for federal employment standards and health and safety inspectors; and

Canada’s unions are also asking the federal government to promote decent work in global supply chains and the extractive sectors by:

  • Appointing a human rights ombudsperson to investigate how Canadian companies’ foreign operations impact human rights;
  • Introducing national due diligence legislation with a monitoring mechanism and an enforcement procedure for large companies.

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