Wrongs of the Right

Please chip in to support more articles like this. Support rabble.ca in its summer fundraiser today for as little as $5 per month!

Canada has the most right-wing government of the Western liberal democracies. For some years we have had the most right-wing media, with only the Toronto Star (and its limited reach outside the GTA) for balance. The right-wing media has featured extreme right-wing commentators regularly, while censoring voices with critical perspectives.


In no other country has organized business had more control of the public agenda than in Canada. And in no country outside the United States have American multinational corporations had more impact on public policy.


So just how well do right-wing ideas hold up today, one year after the world financial crisis? So poorly, you would think the Harper government, the corporate press, right-wing commentators and multinational corporations would be ashamed to be peddling their propaganda. Unfortunately, despite the evidence of things going wrong, the Canadian right accepts no blame, and recognizes no shame.


The idea that market prices allocate resources efficiently and productively without the need for government intervention has been shown to be spectacularly wrong. Following the failure of Lehman Brothers, all but major financial institutions themselves now recognize the need for regulation of financial markets.


After the sub-prime mortgage market collapsed, the idea that markets were forward seeing, and did not make mistakes, that they "rationally expected" whatever comes next, was shown to be totally without foundation.


Such right-wing ideas became predominant in Canada following the 1982 recession, when the Trudeau government appointed the MacDonald Commission, to assess what had happened. The Commission bought into the corporate agenda: replace postwar Canadian practices with the American economic model. Rule out national ownership of resources (potash) or transportation (CN, Air Canada), limit social wages (pensions, minimum wages, U.I., welfare payments), force people to "adjust" to market forces aka corporate priorities, so that investor freedoms trump social and economic rights of citizens.


The overarching right-wing idea trumpeted by the Globe and Mail, the National Post, CTV and (sadly) the CBC was that Canada was regionally confined. We were North American, and geography was destiny. The only ideas worth considering were American ideas, and the only way ahead was to imitate U.S. success. The centre piece of this thinking was the promotion and adoption of so-called free trade, a charter of corporate rights and freedoms that over rides the Canadian Constitution, and negates building a social and economic democracy in Canada.


While Conservative Brian Mulroney brought in the trade deal, the real fathers (no women) were the 150 chief executive officers who made up the Business Council on National Issues (today renamed the CCCE). Despite the change in government from Mulroney to the Chrétien Liberals the right-wing economic agenda progressed as before, and indeed, right-wing attacks on health care, aid to secondary education, transfers to the provinces for welfare payments, and U.I. intensified under the Liberals.


Today, 25 years after the election of Mulroney, corporate Canada celebrates 25 years of uninterrupted control of public affairs. As the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has shown conclusively in a series of studies, Canadians are worse off economically than they were before free trade in 1988.


While many Canadians look to Denmark for ideas on greening our cities, and hope for a positive result to the Copenhagen summit on global warming, our government leads the Western world in climate change denial. While most Canadians reject the Afghanistan mission as a military failure, our government prepares to sign us up for new military duties, when it should be bringing the troops home. While Canadians worry about job and income insecurities, the government prepares to reduce needed spending, on the spurious grounds of the need to reduce the deficit, which is directly related to tax cuts and revenue shortfalls brought about by the recession.


The key right-wing idea about government spending is wrong. Program spending is not too big, it is too small. True enormous amounts are wasted on the military and corporate subsidies, but in the main government spending is far from generous, especially for those in need.


Much of what the right has championed has been good for the super wealthy, and corporations. But, rejecting government by discussion, aka democracy, and relying on fictional reason, only works so long. What the right fears the most is open debate. Bring it on.


Duncan Cameron writes from France.

Related Items

Thank you for reading this story…

More people are reading rabble.ca than ever and unlike many news organizations, we have never put up a paywall – at rabble we’ve always believed in making our reporting and analysis free to all, while striving to make it sustainable as well. Media isn’t free to produce. rabble’s total budget is likely less than what big corporate media spend on photocopying (we kid you not!) and we do not have any major foundation, sponsor or angel investor. Our main supporters are people and organizations -- like you. This is why we need your help. You are what keep us sustainable.

rabble.ca has staked its existence on you. We live or die on community support -- your support! We get hundreds of thousands of visitors and we believe in them. We believe in you. We believe people will put in what they can for the greater good. We call that sustainable.

So what is the easy answer for us? Depend on a community of visitors who care passionately about media that amplifies the voices of people struggling for change and justice. It really is that simple. When the people who visit rabble care enough to contribute a bit then it works for everyone.

And so we’re asking you if you could make a donation, right now, to help us carry forward on our mission. Make a donation today.

Comments

We welcome your comments! rabble.ca embraces a pro-human rights, pro-feminist, anti-racist, queer-positive, anti-imperialist and pro-labour stance, and encourages discussions which develop progressive thought. Our full comment policy can be found here. Learn more about Disqus on rabble.ca and your privacy here. Please keep in mind:

Do

  • Tell the truth and avoid rumours.
  • Add context and background.
  • Report typos and logical fallacies.
  • Be respectful.
  • Respect copyright - link to articles.
  • Stay focused. Bring in-depth commentary to our discussion forum, babble.

Don't

  • Use oppressive/offensive language.
  • Libel or defame.
  • Bully or troll.
  • Post spam.
  • Engage trolls. Flag suspect activity instead.